Need some new religious paraphernalia? In Italy, the markets booming. / Juliette Melton
The Baffler,  February 26, 2016

Daily Bafflements

Need some new religious paraphernalia? In Italy, the markets booming. / Juliette Melton
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• Are you a priest trying to snag rosaries in bulk, or a billionaire looking to deck out your mansion with a full array of Madonnas on the half shell? Luckily, we’ve got a trade show that’s just for you. The Italian market for religious goods is worth $5.2 billion annually, so consumers in the name of Christ will find plenty of shopping opportunities.

• Today in plutocrats: One Australian megamillionaire has ensured his legacy with an $80 million art museum displaying, among other antiques, Napoleon’s pistol and his own ashes, joining in on a trend identified by Rhonda Lieberman in Baffler no. 24. Bored with your polo ponies? Just build your own museum—no knowledge of art required.

• Ahh, the millennial, America’s most confusing consumer. Now, the pundit class puzzles over why he’s shunning breakfast cereal. Too much effort to pour it into a bowl and add milk? Not the kind of thing he can keep in his backpack to scarf down between his three part-time jobs? The likes of Buzzfeed, the New York Times, and Radio Canada were all eager to weigh in.

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Further Reading

 November 9

There was no quibbling over what item on the menu might be more digestible---Virginia voters just carted off the whole buffet.

 November 10

Yesterday’s twin reports on Roy Moore and Louis CK remind us that sexual assault and women’s inequality are still everyone’s problem.

 November 8

Martin McDonagh's "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" finds moral complexity where it needed moral certitude.