Take that, hipsters: turns out, ancient Egyptians were domesticating bees way before it was cool. / mbeo
The Baffler,  November 12, 2015

Daily Bafflements

Take that, hipsters: turns out, ancient Egyptians were domesticating bees way before it was cool. / mbeo
w
o
r
d

f
a
c
t
o
r
y

• NPR reports that the roots of today’s urban beekeeping trend run deeper than previously thought. According to a new study in Nature, humans have been keeping bees for honey and beeswax for nine thousand years.

• The startup world is abuzz lately about Theranos, the healthcare upstart founded by Elizabeth Holmes, one of the nation’s youngest women billionaires. Valued at $9 billion, the company’s stated mission is to make laboratory testing affordable for everyone. Though Theranos currently offers a menu of lab tests for under ten dollars, the technology used to achieve this has been kept top secret, even after the Wall Street Journal questioned its efficacy last month. Outside scientists have not been able to test the company’s methods and only heavily redacted FDA documents have been made public.

• In a recent interview with Guernica, political cartoonist Ted Rall talked about his new graphic biography, Snowden. Of his subject, Rall drew comparisons between the government-worker-turned-fugitive and Europeans living under Nazi occupation: “with the NSA, why was it that, out of all those people who saw all those files, so few people stepped forward? There’s something fucked up when you have to be one in a million to do the right thing.”

You Might Also Enjoy

Fresh Hell

The Baffler

Peaky Blinders Corporate drones interested in shielding yourselves from all distraction not directly related to the accumulation of. . .

word factory

This Is Not A Blip

Aaron Timms

In March, the Colorado River Research Group published a report urging water watchers to stop using the word “drought” to. . .

word factory

Baffler Newsletter

New email subscribers receive a free copy of our current issue.

Further Reading

 November 29

An former Guardian editor lays out a vision of the global media crisis that is largely detached from actual politics.

Heads Up: We recently updated our privacy policy to clarify how and why we collect personal data. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand this policy.