Q&A

Not Just Band-Aids

Emily CarrollFebruary 21, 2017
healthcare rally
healthcare rally

As the Trump administration continues its campaign to repeal Obamacare and Republican legislators dodge constituents in fear of losing their coverage, headlines paint the health care debate as a simple tennis match between the two major parties.

False Idols of the Enlightenment

Ratik AsokanFebruary 07, 2017
PalFest
PalFest

We have to recognize that the modern world was predicated on the notion of mimicry and imitation. Which makes people more and more alike than different. And it makes them more vulnerable to experiencing the same ressentiment when their particular identities are under threat, when their stability is threatened, when their jobs are taken away.

Zephyr Teachout: We’re Mired in Corruption

Dave DenisonJanuary 27, 2017
On the money. / 
Dave Denison
On the money. / 
Dave Denison

Speaking on the morning of January 20, 2017, as Donald Trump was about to take the oath of office, Zephyr Teachout observed: “He’s on track to violate a key provision of the Constitution within the next hour or so. The moment he’s sworn in.” Teachout’s book “Corruption in America” examines shifting concerns about political corruption from the early days of the republic to today’s full-blown oligarchy.

Born and Bred

Emily CarrollNovember 07, 2016
Interrogating the narrative around Trump's white base. / Gage Skidmore
Interrogating the narrative around Trump's white base. / Gage Skidmore

This election cycle has been rife with punditry on the anger of the white working class, supposedly fueling Donald Trump’s rise to prominence. But like many of the overblown narratives rounding out the cable news cycle in this bizarre election, it’s not quite true.

When All Boats Aren’t Lifted

Lindsey GilbertOctober 18, 2016
Eddie Glaude at a teach-in at Emerson College on October 14.
Eddie Glaude at a teach-in at Emerson College on October 14.

One of the key features of our current malaise is what I call “disremembering.” The fact is that some people in this country think that we have double digit unemployment because black people don’t want to work. They think that white wealth is thirteen times that of black wealth because we’re not working hard; because we’re not diligent or self-reliant; because we’re dependent, victim-mongering, relying on black victimization.

The Election That Mattered

Dave DenisonOctober 06, 2016
A book for these times.
A book for these times.

David Daley makes the case in his new book RATF**KED that if you don’t understand what happened in 2010, you don’t understand something fundamental about why American politics is the way it is today. “It’s the biggest political heist in modern times,” he says.

Q & A with Geert Lovink

Will MeyerAugust 09, 2016
Institute of Network Cultures
Institute of Network Cultures

Presently holed up at the Amsterdam School of Applied Sciences, 7,000 miles from Silicon Valley, tech critic Geert Lovink has held it down in different forms of European bohemia since the eighties, asking, over a series of five books: How can we use technology to actually make the world a better place?

Q & A with Neda Semnani

Neda Semnani, Lucie ElvenJanuary 11, 2016
Sarbedaran guerillas before the insurrection at Amol.
Sarbedaran guerillas before the insurrection at Amol.

In 1979, Iranians living abroad, Neda Semnani’s parents among them, rushed back to Tehran to enjoy the fruits of the Islamic Revolution—only to find Khomeini an even more repressive leader than the Shah. Nursing a young family, Semnani’s mother gave up politics, detaching herself from the increasingly dangerous underground leftist opposition network.

Q&A: Judy Wajcman on the Scapegoating of the Email Inbox, Busyness as a Status Marker, the Division of Labor at Home, and More

Lauren KirchnerJanuary 23, 2015
Pressed for Time, by Judy Wajcman
Pressed for Time, by Judy Wajcman

Last April, an erroneous story got passed around online that the French government was considering making it illegal for people to answer work emails after 6 p.m. It was soon discredited—the proposal came from two unions, in the context of a contract negotiation, rather than from the government—but not before the mischaracterized version was picked up by what seemed like every single news site in America.

Q&A: Cynthia M. Duncan on Poverty and Politics in Rural America

Lauren KirchnerJanuary 09, 2015
Worlds Apart, by Cynthia M. Duncan
Worlds Apart, by Cynthia M. Duncan

Twenty years ago, the stock market was high, and national unemployment was low. But not everyone had an equal claim to that growing bubble. When University of New Hampshire sociologist Cynthia M. Duncan published the first edition of her book Worlds Apart in 1999, she exposed the hard realities for rural communities where both jobs and hope were packing up and leaving.

Q&A: Ian Klaus on the History of Fraudsters, Fakes, the Financial Press, and More

Lauren KirchnerDecember 19, 2014
Forging Capitalism, by Ian Klaus
Forging Capitalism, by Ian Klaus

Trust is like gold: it’s at the heart of capitalism, and it’s a commodity that can be either invested or squandered. As Ian Klaus tells it, the history of modern finance is a story of the constant interplay between trust and risk, and between gentlemen and rogues.

Q&A: Nicholas Carr on Computers, Toilet Technology, the Hollowing-Out of the Middle Class, and More

Lauren KirchnerDecember 12, 2014
GlassCagebook
GlassCagebook

Nicholas Carr’s previous book The Shallows issued a warning about what the Internet is doing to our brains. His new one, The Glass Cage: Automation and Us (Norton, 288 pages, $26.95), warns us about what computer technology is doing to our lives—our jobs, our economy, and our sense of fulfillment as human beings within the natural world.

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