Not pictured: sex toy or cuff links. / Photo by Ian McKellar
The Baffler,  October 29, 2014

Daily Bafflements

Not pictured: sex toy or cuff links. / Photo by Ian McKellar
w
o
r
d

f
a
c
t
o
r
y

• Business Insider reports on a new sex toy that is apparently “exclusively for bankers.” No, we don’t know what that means, either, but it apparently comes with silver cufflinks and a money clip. Probably a prank. We approve.

• San Francisco mayor Ed Lee has signed a re-zoning bill that essentially legalizes Airbnb there, and San Franciscans are mourning the imminent death of many of the city’s neighborhoods.

• “Labor brokers providing Indian high-tech workers to American companies have hijacked a professional visa program, creating an underground system of financial bondage by stealing wages and benefits, even suing workers who quit,” according to a huge new report from the Center for Investigative Reporting and the Guardian. (Via Helen DeWitt.)

• The cover of the latest issue of TIME magazine, featuring a gavel about to smash down on an apple, and the text “It’s nearly impossible to fire a bad teacher: some tech millionaires may have found a way to change that” is pretty great and not at all tone-deaf or offensive to anyone. So that’s good.

You Might Also Enjoy

Just Deserts

Jay Baron Nicorvo

Some seventy-two years from the last American execution for desertion, the firing squad is a tough-guy pantomime for hacks and hams.

word factory

Over Our Heads

Dave Denison

I was wandering in a smoldering landscape, knowing that nothing could be done. The decisions had been made.

word factory

Baffler Newsletter

new email subscribers receive a digital copy of our current issue.

Further Reading

 November 9

There was no quibbling over what item on the menu might be more digestible---Virginia voters just carted off the whole buffet.

 November 10

Yesterday’s twin reports on Roy Moore and Louis CK remind us that sexual assault and women’s inequality are still everyone’s problem.

 November 8

Martin McDonagh's "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" finds moral complexity where it needed moral certitude.